Record

LevelFile
Finding Number (Click this to view full catalogue structure)UB/STW/1/1
TitleCorrespondence of Senior Tutor to Women Students A-B
Extent1 file
Date1931-1949
Description/1: from Joan Allen, Castledene, Lower High Street, Stourbridge, Worcs[Worcestershire]: She has spoken to the Director of Education for Worcestershire and hopes to begin probationary teaching after Christmas. She has completed application forms for the two year [teaching] course, 29 November 1937
/2: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Joan Allen: She is glad that she has been able to arrange teaching and hopes she will enjoy it. She has spoken about her to Dr Braid when she saw here recently and she approves of the plans, 30 November 1937
/3: from Joan Allen, Castledene, Lower High Street, Stourbridge, Worc[Worcestershire]: Thanks Jane Milne for her letter and invitation to visit her when in Birmingham. She has begun a period of probationary teaching in a local elementary school,, 15 December 1937
/4: from M. Hammond, The Education Department (Women's Divison), The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham: Comments on Joan Allen who tells her that Milne recommended that she apply for the two-year [teacher training] course at Birmingham. She gained a bad report for teaching from the Head of her first school, and has been moved to another school. Asks Milne whether Joan Allen would reach the academic standard in four subjects or whether she should go to a residential two-year teaching college where 'I am told, the standard is somewhat less exacting', 15 February 1938
/5: from Joan Allen, Castledene, Lower High Street, Stourbridge, Worc[Worcestershire]: She has written to Miss Hammond who has put her name on the waiting list, and has written to Miss Evans, her Headmistress, asking for a report on her teaching abilities at the end of the term, so that she could consider her application again, 19 February 1938
/6: from M. Hammond, The Education Department (Women's Divison), The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham: She has received an adverse report on Joan Allen's teaching promise from the Director of Education in Worcestershire. As this is the second unsatisfactory report she has received she has written to say she cannot accept her for the Education Department at Birmingham, 3 May 1938
/7: from M. Hammond, The Education Department (Women's Divison), The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham: She is sorry about Joan Allen. Miss Shepherd showed Milne the letter from Mr Priestley and the first report from her Headmistress on her teaching promise was good. Since then she has given an adverse report, which is the second bad report she has received, so she is fairly sure she is not suitable for teaching. If Milne decides that she should have a longer trial then she suggests that Joan Allen should get a more suitable training for her capacities in a residential teaching college. She thinks Mr Priestley would allow her to continue practising in an elementary school if Miss Allen decides on this course. It is possible that Miss Scott, formerly a member of staff at Birmingham, now Principal of Kenton Lodge Training College, Newcastle-on-Tyne, may have a vacancy, 7 May 1938
/8; copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne, Senior Woman Tutor, to Colley Lane Girls School, Cradley, near Stourbridge: She has heard that Joan Allen has been recommended not to take up teaching. Thinks it would be helpful in advising her as to her future career if she could arrange a meeting with staff at the school [she has been doing teaching practice], 9 May 1938
/9: copy of letter from?E.S to Miss Adams: She has spoken to Miss Milne about her trip to France, and she wonders why Paris has been chosen for the holiday course as it will be difficult for her to make contacts and 'gain any benefit' in a city of that size, and she will spend more money on transport. Asks whether it is a holiday course recommended by the N[National] U[Union] of S[Students]. Miss Milne suggests that she attends a course at Tours, Caen or St Malo. The journey would not be so long and the cost of living would be cheaper. Also mentions Grenoble where the cost of living would also be cheaper. Mentions that the course at Tours is run by the University of Poitiers and the course at St Malo by the University of Boulogne. She should write to the Faculte des Lettres of these four universities to make enquiries ad to ask for the names of recommended families, not boarding houses, where she could stay. Because of Miss Milne's strong recommendation that she should not go to Paris, she has not enclosed a certificate for reduced fare but will wait until she hears from her, 11 Auigust 1939
/10: from Jean M. Andrews, Lyndhurst, Southminster, Essex: She has a provisional place at the University and asks whether Miss Milne can answer her queries about the day she needs to arrive for Registration, whether there are clothing regulations, and whether the University has a list of essential items to bring, 11 August 1949
/11: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Miss Andrews: Gives dates for the start of term and the Guild of Undergraduates introductory conference. Explains that there are no regulations about clothing execpt that students are supposed to provide themselves with cap and gown. Suggests that she should bring shorts because some form of physical activity is compulsory in the first year, but she might decide to buy sports clothes after she arrives and has decided what [physical] activity she will take up, 15 August 1949
/12: from Margaret K. Arnold, c/o Mrs Worthington, Cricklewood, Longon Road, Lichfield: Thanks Milne for her letter and offer to see her. She wants to discuss finances and opportunities but especially the course that sould be best to take. She knows that the course for a Social Study Diploma cannot be taken until the age of 20. She expects to leave school in the summer after her Higher School Certificate but does not want a break in her studies. It has been suggested that she should study for a degree and afterwards take the Social Study Diploma course, and asks which degree she should take. She gives the subjects she is studying for the Higher School Certificate, 30 January 1941
/13: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Margaret K. Arnold: Suggests that she could arrange a meeting with her if she is likely to come home for half term. Confirms that she is too young for a Social Study Diploma and suggests that an Honours Degree in Social and Political Science followed by a Social Study Diploma in one year is a better course. Informs her that she can get an idea of costs from the syllabus, undated [February 1941]
/14: from E. M. Keen, King Edward's Grammar School for Girls, Camp Hill, Birmingham, now at The Friary School for Girls, Lichfield: Discusses Margaret Arnold, and mentions that she has been determined to train as a Hospital Almoner, 'rather unusual for a girl of her years'. She has had a meeting with Miss Truscott and was advised to take a degree course and is now wondering which subject to take for her degree. Comments that 'she is a little shy & will need a little drawing out & encouragement before you will get her to talk'. Gives a good account of her skills and maturity, 28 February 1941
/15: from Margaret K. Arnold, King Edward's Grammar School for Girls, Camp Hill, Birmingham, now at The Friary School for Girls, Lichfield: Asks whether she can see Milne for a meeting, [1941]
/16: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Margaret K. Arnold, Friary School for Girls, Lichfield: Agrees to a meeting on 3 March, 21 February 1941
/17: from Barbara M. Ansell, 24 Jury Street, Warwick: Thanks Milne for her kindness in meeting her and giving her advice. She has written to the Medical School about a vacancy for the following October and has had an interview with the Sub-Dean who has offered her a vacancy in the second year course if she passed Higher Certificate or First M.B. She has now heard that she has passed First M.B and will be able to enrol at the Medical School, 22 July 1941
/18: from M. Hammond, The Education Department (Women's Divison), The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham: She has heard that Margaret Ashton will not be spending year year in France but will be training [in the Education Department] the following academic session. She has written to Hammond asking permission to intercalate a year in order to travel abroad, and the request will be forwarded to the Board of Education, unless she hears otherwise from Milne, 6 July 1939
/19: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to P. E. Meadon, Director of Education, County Education Offices, Preston, Lanc[Lancashire]: Discusses the financial situation of Dorothy Aspinall, a student in the Honours School of French who holds a yearly loan from the Lancashire Education Committee and also a Board of Education grant. She is hoping to study at a French University during the summer term but has recently heard 'of the failure of her father in business' and so will not be able to receive maintenance from home. Asks whether it would be possible to increase the maintenance provided by the Education Committee, and assures him that the student is doing well academically and deserves help, 13 March 1935
/20: from P. E. Meadon, Director of Education, Education Department, County Offices, Preston: The loan already promised to Dorothy Aspinall for her Birmingham course is £30 a year for four years, the maximum that can be lent to any one student. The Committee have no regulations under which they could make an additional grant for the purpose of travel abroad, 18 March 1935
/21: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to P. E. Meadon, Director of Education, County Education Offices, Preston, Lanc[Lancashire]: Thanks him for his reply and accepts that Dorothy Aspinall has already been given the maximum loan, 22 March 1935
/22: from Dorothy Aspinall, 85 Avenue Aristide Briand, Rennes, Ille et Vilaine, France: She hopes to find an au pair post soon. Her father is about to lose his job and will not be able to give her any money to finish her training. One of her aunts had offered to help but is now supporting her son to continue research work at Aberystwyth after getting First Class Honours in Chemistry. She is applying to Lancashire County Education Committee for a Training College Scholarship for 1935-1936 and 1936-1937 and asks whether Milne can write to the Director of Education on her behalf, 3 July 1935
/23: from representative of Ville de Paris Ecole Communale de Jeunes Filles: Letter of recommendation for the Augier family, 10 July 1935. In French
/24: from Dorothy Aspinall, 85 Avenue Aristide Briand, Rennes, Ille et Vilaine, France: She has found a post as an au pair with Monsiuer and Madame Augier in Paris, via the Office des Universites et des Ecoles Nationales. Gives details of her plans to travel to Paris and then Fontainebleau and possibly the coast or to Monsiuer Augier's mother's house in the country. Mentions that there are two children of 12 and 14 and she will be giving English lessons and will be free to stay with the family until the end of September. Encloses a letter of recommendation for the family (see UB/STW/1/1/23), 11 July 1935
/25: from Dorothy Aspinall, Hotel du Cadran Bleu, 9 Rue Grande, Fontainebleau, Seine et Marne, France: Gives details of recent sightseeing with the family. She has had a letter from the Director of Education at Preston and will need to attend a personal interview before a decision can be made about a scholarship, 13 July 1935
/26: from Dorothy Aspinall, Hotel du Cadran Bleu, 9 Rue Grande, Fontainebleau, Seine et Marne, France: The Director of Education at Preston has written to inform her that it is likely she will receive a Training College scholarship, together with a loan, for the last two years of her course, but she will need to have an interview in Preston in September. She is happy with the Augier family and the children, and is planning to return to Paris with Madame Augier and spend a week there before returning to England, 25 July 1935
/27: from Dorothy Aspinall, Hotel du Cadran Bleu, 9 Rue Grande, Fontainebleau, Seine et Marne, France: She is sorry to hear about Milne's accident and hopes she has recovered. Informs her again about her correspondence with the Director of Education for Lancashire about her application for a scholarship and her forthcoming interview in Preston. She has been informed that her loan has been promised for four years and would be continued for the next two years if her work and progress were satisfactory. She would like to continue her degree if possible but even with the loan and Education Department grant she will not be able to pay her University House fees and for books, travelling expenses, and clothing unless she is granted the Training College scholarship. Asks Milne's advice about what she should do. Repeats her previous news about the au pair post with the Augier family and her plans to accompany Madame Augier to Paris before returning to England, 1 August 1935
/28: from Dorothy Aspinall, Hotel du Cadran Bleu, 9 Rue Grande, Fontainebleau, Seine et Marne, France: Her father has now lost his post as Manager to the Creditors and he and her mother are trying to sell their house and find a smaller one with a shop. She hopes to be able to continue her degree but will have to wait for her interview with the Director of Education for Lancashire. She is sorry to hear that Milne's accident was serious and hopes she will soon be better. She has recently had a 'verrue plantaire' [verruca] which she had to have 'electrically burnt'. She is now able to walk well, 8 August 1935
/29: from Dorothy Aspinall, Mayfield, Kiln Lane, Eccleston, Nr St Helens, Lanc[Lancashire]: She has attended an interview at Preston for the Training College scholarship and has been told she will be recommended to the Committee and advised to come to Birmingham for the start of term. Hopes Milne has recovered from her accident, 24 September 1935
/30: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne, Hospital de la Vallee, Le Sentier, Vaud, Switzerland, to Dorothy Aspinall: Apologises for the delay in replying to her letter. She has had an accident and has been in hospital. She is sorry to hear about Aspinall's continued financial troubles and hopes she will be successful in obtaining a scholarship. Alternatively the Education Department at Birmingham might be able to allow her to complete her two year training course in one year, 23 July 1935
/31: from Dorothy Aspinall, 29 Ribble Road, Fleetwood, Lanc[Lancashire]: Gives news about her new post at Fleetwood Grammar School. Discusses the repayment of her loan to the University authorities and the Lancashire Education Committee. She is continuing to send money to her family 'the war has not helped traed in groceries and provisions' but plans to send 10 shillings a month from February, and will be able to increase the amount once the County loan is repaid. Gives news about her teaching position and lodgings. Goes on to give news about fellow students including a friend called Flora who is still living in France. 'I hardly dare let myself think about her, poor girl. When France collapsed I felt quite ill for a month or two, thinking about all my friends there, and especially of her'. She has not tried to write to her since the German occupation but has written to her mother who has heard that Flora is still living in Brittany and Albert is a prisoner of war in Nancy. Goes on to give news about another former student, 'Rosalind', who is living in Ilfracombe, and brief details about 'Beryl' and 'Pauline B' who has recently married and is now in Swanage with her husband who is in the R.A.F. She has read in the 'Daily Telegraph' about damage to the University of Birmingham caused by bombs and that 'some student had been killed, and some of the staff injured', 6 February 1941
/32: from Dorothy Aspinall, 29 Ribble Road, Fleetwood, Lanc[Lancashire] to Professor Ritchie [French Department]: She is now teaching French, English, and Games at Fleetwood Grammar School. She was shocked to read in the 'Daily Telegraph' that some Birmingham students had been killed and some staff injured by bombs. Hopes that he and Mrs Ritchie 'and all the lecturers in the French School' have not suffered from the 'blitzkrieg' and sends good wishes for 1941, 6 February 1941
/33: from Dorothy Aspinall, 29 Ribble Road, Fleetwood, Lanc[Lancashire]: Thanks Milne for her letter and encloses 10 shillings. She has had more news about Flora [a friend and former student living in France] who has had twins, and is now living in Paris with Albert's mother, but Albert is in Germany [as a prisoner of war]. Hopes that Flora will be alright and has enough food. She has been on fire watching duty and had to go to the school when the siren went off. She has also joined a First Aid post . She is reading Alfred Noyes' biography of Voltaire and comments on the book. Asks about Miss Walton [Hilda Walton, former Warden of University House], 16 March 1941
/34: copy of letter on behalf of Jane Johnston Milne to Mr Norgroves: Informs him that Milne has received 10 shillings from Dorothy Aspinall, the first instalment from the loan of fifteen pounds which she is repaying. Asks for receipt, 17 March 1941
/35: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Miss Aufrecht: She has been in touch with Miss Rouger and they both think that she should apply for a Degree in Commerce if she wants to study for a degree, 5 March 1941
/36: from [illegible] Aufrecht, St Mary's Vicarage, Selly Oak [Birmingham]: she has now decided to take a 'commercial degree in languages' and has changed her mind about going to University. She realises that she cannot expect the committee to keep her for three years, 7 March 1941
/37: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to unidentified recipient: Writes in support of Hazel Baker's application for financial assistance for her studies at University, and particularly in her plans to train for teaching the following year. Mentions her studies in History, her membership of the 1st Hockey team, and her position as chair of the History Students' Fellowship, as well as her good character and temperament, 24 January 1946
/38: typed list of expenses for student living in University House, January 1946
/39: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to C. Burton, [University Secretary]: Writes in support of Mary Barber, a student in the School of Music, who is applying for financial assistance from the Women Students' Loan Fund, 14 December 1939
/40: from Mary C. Barber, 46 Edwards Road, Erdington, Birmingham: She has received the cheque and thanks Milne for her kindness. The money will help with the expenses her mother has to face. Thanks her also for the use of her ticket for the 'City Orchestra concerts', 23 December [1939]
/41: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Vice-Chancellor [Raymond Priestley]: Writes in support of Mary Barber, a third year Music student who 'shows great talent in her work' who has had difficulties paying her expenses since the death of her father, and who might receive assistance from the Vice-Chancellor's 'poor students fund', 24 April 1940
/42: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Dr Innes: Writes in support of Mary Barber who is to take the B.Mus degree in the summer and has been accepted in the Women's Education Department for training. She has a Board of Education grant but will need some additional financial help. A maintenance grant from the [City of Birmingham] Education Committee which she has held on the grounds that her father died in the services of the Committee, will now end. Asks whether she might be able to receive any further financial help for her teacher training, 27 May 1940
/43: from W. O. Lester Smith, Director of Education, City of Manchester: Asks Milne for a reference for Dorothy Evelyn Barker who has applied for a post as Assistant Mistress in French and English at Central High School for Girls, 19 June 1939
/44: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to W. O. Lester Smith, Education Offices, Manchester, providing reference for Dorothy E. Barker, 21 June 1939
/45: from Janette Barker, University House, Edgbaston Park Road [Birmingham]: She and Miss Moore have enquired about the job in the Assessment of War Damage Office and have both been offered posts. Miss Moore is starting next week. Asks whether Milne can provide references, undated [1939-1945]
/46: note, possibly from Professor Ritchie [Professor of French] to Jane Johnston Milne commenting on Geoff Barrett [student in the French Department] and his time studying abroad, 30 April 1934
/47: from G. B. Barrett, Homeleigh, Church Road, Birmingham: Explains that he has had an operation to remove his appendix and is currently in a nursing home. Refers to his ill health and recovery from survey. Mentions his plans to return home and then to spend time in Folkestone, where his brother lives, before travelling to France. Asks whether it is worth studying at Nancy university if he cannot travel to France until the middle of May, or whether he should travel around France instead, 30 April 1934
/48: from G. B. Barrett, Villa St Hubert, Rue Bel Air, Laxou, Nancy: He is now in France. He was sick on the crossing but is beginning to feel better. He has lodgings with a family and got the address from the university. He plans to go to Hohwald after the end of term. He has written to Monsieur 'Gemahliz' and unless he is still on his military service he hopes to see him. Asks whether he should attend a 'cours de vacances'. He has been told his French accent is 'gentil' but he is spending most of his time studying German, 8 June [1934]
/49: from G. B. Barrett, Villa St Hubert, Rue Bel Air, Laxou, Nancy: He has had to postpone his visit to Le Hohwald because he has been ill. He thinks it would be better to stay with a French family instead of a hotel and asks if Milne has a suitable address in the Vosges, 19 June 1934
/50: from G. B. Barrett, Villa Pension Ermitage, Le Hohwald, pres Barr, Alsace: He is staying at a quiet hotel and he is feeling homesick. He has no energy to read, talk, or walk and is afraid of becoming ill again as he was at Nancy. He hopes to feel in a better mood later. Mentions that the place he is staying is 'a resort for invalids' and so he is sure of being well treated, undated, [June 1934]
/51: from G. B. Barrett, Villa St Hubert, Rue Bel Air, Laxou, Nancy to Professor Ritchie: Thanks him for his letter. He is staying with a 'kind & sociable' French family and intends to travel to Le Hohwald in the Vosges. He will not be sorry to leave Nancy 'no town is very attractive in summer'. He has not been feeling well and this has made him reluctant to make conversation, so he thinks he has not made progress with his French, 11 June 1934
/52: from Eva Barrett, 377 Gillotts Road, Birmingham: Thanks Milne for her letter to her son, Geoff, which she has forwarded, as he has now travelld to France. She hopes the change will help him 'out of his depression & those weak feelings which come over him at times', 7 June 1934
/53: from Eva Barrett, 377 Gillotts Road, Birmingham: Arranges to call at the University to talk to Milne about her son, Geoff. He has been ill but has now moved to Hohwald. He has had to see a doctor again who say he 'has a swollen liver, caused by the illness at Nancy', 27 June [1934]
/54: from Eva Barrett, 377 Gillotts Road, Birmingham: Thanks Milne for her letter. She feels much happier about Geoff. She is convinced his unhappiness is mostly due to nerves, and hopes he will stay where he is until he feels 'quite himself', undated [June-July 1934]
/55: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Miss Wilmott [Head Mistress, Brownhills High School, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent]: Explains the financial situation of Lois Beatrice Barrows, who will have to pay for her fees and maintenance for a fourth year at the University of Birmingham to study Classics. Asks whether the student's family are likely to be able to help. Comments on the student's poor health and 'anxious' termperament which 'complicates the problem', 23 June 1937
/56: from Elizabeth Wilmott, Head Mistress, Brownhills High School, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent: Gives her view of the academic abilities of Lois Barrows, and of her sister, who has been studying for a degree at Bristol. Both have obtained Education Grants, but neither obtained scholarships. Comments on the financial position of the girls' parents and suggests that it might be possible for the school to offer a partial scholarship if the University could also provide some funds to enable her to complete her degree, 24 June 1937
/57: letter from Charles Grant Robertson, Vice-Chancellor, University of Birmingham: Sets out his observations on the content of Elizabeth Wilmott's letter (UB/STW/1/1/56). He has met Lois Barrows and concluded that she would not be eligible for assistance from his 'Poor Students' Fund'. Suggests that there is no evidence that the Faculty of Arts or the University offered her financial assistance to complete the additional fourth year of study, 25 June 1937
/58: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Professor [George] Thomson: Asks him to read the enclosed letters from the Head Mistress of Brownhills School (UB/STW/1/1/56) and the Vice-Chancellor's comments (UB/STW/1/1/57). Asks whether he and Professor Oliver Thomson can raise the case of Lois Barrows at the Faculty [of Arts] and Milne will explain why she cannot find additional money for her and why she thinks it is not in the student's interest that she does so, 25 June 1937
/59: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Elizabeth Wilmott: Explains that it has been decided to offer Lois Barrows a Pass Degree. If she accepts this she can start training in September. If not, she will have to meet the expenses of the next year at University from family resources, 29 June 1937
/60: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Vice-Chancellor [Charles Grant Robertson]: Thanks him for his observations about Elizabeth Wilmott's letter about Lois Barrows. Explains that it has been decided at the Faculty of Arts meeting to offer her a Pass Degree, which will not require any further loan or grant, 30 June 1937
/61: from Charles Grant Robertson, Vice-Chancellor, University of Birmingham: Thanks Milne for her letter about Lois Barrows. Thinks that a Pass Degree is the wisest course for her, and agrees with her judgement against any further loan being negotiated, 30 June 1937
/62: from Jane Johnston Milne, The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham to Lois Barrows: She knows that Lois Barrows will now have spoken to Professor G [George] Thomson and will know the decision he wishes her to make. She is sorry it is not possible to make her a grant for a final year in the School of Classics but explains the reasons for this, 1 July 1937
/63: from Lois Barrows, University House, Edgbaston Park Road, Birmingham: thanks Milne for her letter. She has seen and talked to Professor Thomson but she is determined to continue to study for an Honours degree if she can get the money. She has agreed not to borrow any more but hopes to get it from relatives, 2 July 1937
/64: from Elle L. Ritchie, Head Mistress, George Dixon Grammar School for Girls, Edgbaston, Birmingham: Asks for Milne's advice about a pupil of hers, Betty Barwell, who is considering studying Engineering. Gives details about Betty Barwell's family background and financial circumstances. Mentions scholarships and maintenance allowances she is receiving. Suggests that Betty Barwell's aunt, who is her guardian, does not support her going to University to study Engineering. Mentions other possible sources of funding, and the difficulties she would have in continuing to study science subjects in the sixth form which might require her to study at the Boys school. Mentions her own suggestion that Betty should become a Factory Inspector, 27 June 1942
/65: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to E.L. Ritchie, George Dixon Grammar School for Girls, Birmingham: She has spoken to the Registrar about whether Betty Barwell would be advised to study Engineering. States that 'you, no doubt, are aware that engineering for women is a very precarious career; one must confess that there is a good deal of prejudice against a woman and, for a student without backing and without money, it might be a rash qualification to take'. Suggests that if she does want to study Engineering, Electrical Engineering would be the best choice. She could then study the course for the Higher School Certificate at the boys school and she could apply for a state bursary, either for the full course in Electrical Engineering or for Electrical Engineering with radio. Mentions that she can only remember one woman graduate in engineering, and 'she found electrical research a better field than practical engineering', 3 July 1942
/66: from Ella L. Ritchie, Head Mistress, George Dixon Grammar School for Girls, Edgbaston, Birmingham: Thanks Milne for her advice about Betty Barwell which has strengthened her opinion that she should warn her not to apply for a degree course in Engineering, 7 July 1942
/67: from Dorothy M. Benton, 114 Stratford St [Street], Leeds: Thanks Milne for remembering her application for work. She has now married Kent Whies, and they have been living in Leeds where he has a parish. Gives news about her former colleagues from the British Institute of Florence. She has heard that Hilda Cox has taken a post as 'Lady Help' in the Isle of Mull but has been unable to get any linguistic work, 'except an ill paid job at the Censorship' which she left because 'Italian knowledge was not considered "linguistic"'. She has heard that her sister Muriel has been bombed out of the hosue they took on Hayling Island to be near her husband, a Naval Chaplain, 16 May 1941
/68: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Dorothy Benton: She thinks Dorothy has chosen the 'better way' [in getting married rather than seeking a job]. The post she had writen to her about was with the Ministry of Economic Warfare. A former student had written to tell her that there was a vacancy in her department as an assistant, but they have not been able to find a suitable person to fill it, 19 May 1941
/69: from Betty Barton, 159B Whoberley Avenue, Coventry: Discusses a stsudent only identified as Joan and reasons for wanting to change universities [possibly to Birmingham], including increased expenses, and uninspiring lecturers at her current university. Comments on her linguistic abilities and her interests in Economics and attending Workers Educational Association lectures. Comments on Joan's desire for change, and refers briefly to a previous period of ill health, 1 March 1944
/70: from Erna Hollitscher, British Federation of University Women, Ltd, Emergency Sub-Committee for Refugees: The Warden of University House, Janet Carpenter, has asked her to write to Milne about Marianne Bauer, a student from Vienna. She has been interviewed by representatives from the International Federation of University Women and they have spoken to Dr Janowitz, one of her former teachers, who have all given good reports of her talents and character. Thinks it would be a 'waste if she had to go on doing domestic work instead of continuing her studies'. Gives details about possible sources of financial assistance and efforts to ensure that Marianne Bauer can stay at University House. Asks whether it might be possible to give free tuition to Marianne Bauer and comments 'I know that the University authorities have been extremely generous to other refugees', 10 April 1940
/71: typed translations of testimonials for Marianne Bauer written by Professor Dora Singer, Girls High School in Vienna, and Hofrat Dr Heinrich Gassner, School Inspector under the Austrian Government, September 1938
/72: typed copy of statement by Marianne Bauer on her education in Austria which also mentions that she has been in England since November 1938 and working as a general domestic servant, and has been caring for her parents who came to England in June 1938, 22 January 1940
/73: from officer of Birmingham Co-Ordinating Committee for Refugees: Dr Hollitscher, Secretary of the British Federation of University Women, has asked for help with Marianne Bauer who has been working in biology and wanted to specialise in bacteriology. Asks whether free tuition will be possible. University House can offer her board at £1 a week, and she thinks the National Union of Students has been asked to help with that. Goes on to give personal news, 11 April 1940
/74: from Erna Hollitscher, British Federation of University Women, Ltd, Emergency Sub-Committee for Refugees: Thanks Milne for her letter. She had not realised that teaching will finish at the end of May at the University of Birmingham, and had thought that Marianne Bauer could go there for a few months in the summer term. Thanks Milne for sponsoring the case, and for offering Marianne Bauer the possibility of free tuition for the Autumn Term. Hopes that University House can take her then at the reduced fee of £1 a week. Asks whether that will be possible, considering the large number of applications from English students. The International Student Service and the Education Department of Bloomsbury House, as well as the British Federation of University Women committee are all keen to co-operate, and are grateful for Milne's help. On the reverse of the letter is a typed copy of Milne's reply which confirms that there are 'a few vacancies for free places for foreign students' but that Marianne Bauer's case will be brought before the Senate if there are any places vacant for the next academic session, 18-19 April 1940
/75: from Erna Hollitscher, British Federation of University Women, Ltd, Emergency Sub-Committee for Refugees: She has had a letter from Marianne Bauer saying that she thinks she has failed her examinations. One reason for this might be that, 'quite apart from the strain to which we are all subjected', her fiance, 'who had been fighting in France for the Allies, has been reported missing and there seems to be little doubt that he is dead'. Asks whether these private reasons can be taken into consideration and, if she has failed, whether there is a possibility of her obtaining a free place at the University next year, 1 July 1941
/76: from Erna Hollitscher, British Federation of University Women, Ltd, Emergency Sub-Committee for Refugees: She has had a letter from Marianne Bauer telling her that the results of her examinations are poor. She had hoped that she had done better in these examinations, but she will now have to ask her Committee whether they wish to continue their grant. Asks for Milne's opinion about Marianne Bauer's academic abilities and whether she should continue her studies or 'do some practical work towards the war effort'. Also mentions [Hildegarde] Nothmann who she hopes is now receiving her allowance regularly from the International Student Service, 15 December 1941
/77: copy of letter from Marianne Bauer, 88 Orchard Road, Erdington, Birmingham to Erna Hollitscher [British Federation of University Women, Ltd, Emergency Sub-Committee for Refugees]: She has her examination results and has passed Honours Zoology but did not pass Botany. Explains the problems she had with the examination papers and hopes to re-take the exam in September. She has spoken to some of the lecturers in Zoology and to the Professor and they have given three possibilities. She sets these out in the letter and states that she would like to continue with Zoology. Asks whether the Committe might give her further support, 27 June 1942
/78: from Erna Hollitscher, British Federation of University Women, Ltd, Emergency Sub-Committee for Refugees: Asks for Milne's advice about whether to support Marianne Bauer financially for the next academic year following her disappointing examination results. Asks whether Milne would advise her to continue with her studies despite failing her Botany examination. The Committee have paid for tutoring in Botany and Zoology and they cannot understand why she has failed again. After whether students can take a War Degree after half a year National Service when they have failed, 30 June 1942
/79: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Erna Hollitscher, British Federation of University Women, Ltd, Emergency Sub-Committee for Refugees: She has spoken to the Registrar about Marianne Bauer. It is agreed that she can continue to hold her free place at the University, but everything depends on her passing her Botany examination in September. Sets out the options available to her if she passes, and for future training for either teaching or laboratory work, 3 July 1942
/80: note in pencil on Marianne Bauer which appears to confirm that she passed her Botany examination in September 1942
/81: from Erna Hollitscher, British Federation of University Women, Ltd, Emergency Sub-Committee for Refugees: She has read Milne's letter about Marianne Bauer to the Committee at their meeting. It has been decided that she should re-take her Botany examination in September, and are grateful to the University of Birmingham for continuing to hold her free place open if she passes. The Committee thinks there would be a good chance of her getting a teaching post, as 'in their experience, the employment position for refugees has greatly improved during the last year'. Mentions that there are now a number of 'foreign graduates', most without an English degree, who have found work in private and other schools, 9 July 1942
/82: from M. E. Popham, Ladies' College, Cheltenham, to Senior Professor of Modern Languages, The University, Birmingham: Asks for recommendations for an 'outstandingly good graduate' with a few years' teaching experience for a post teaching French at the College, 26 April 1946
/83: from Margaret E. Popham, Ladies' College, Cheltenham: Thanks Milne for her letter and gives further details about the requirements for the post, 29 April 1946
/84: from C [Christine] M. Bedson, High House, Landsown Road, Bath: Thanks Milne for recommending her for the post at Cheltenham. She has been offered the post but is still undecided, 17 May 1946
/85: from W. M. Cook, Head Mistress, City of Bath Girls' School, Oldfield Park, Bath: She is sorry to lose Miss Bedson from the staff and asks whether Milne can suggest a student to fill the post. She is prepared to accept a student in training 'though it will be difficult to find any one as good as Miss Bedson, even though she has been here only a year'. She feels she can ask the University of Birmingham for help as she was recently on the staff of Edgbaston High School, 21 May 1946
/86: from Yvonne M. S. Blackall, 15 Church Street, Warwick: She has heard from Miss Evans that Milne might advise her on her plans for next year. Explains that she has been hoping to take a Teachers Training course at the Royal Academy of Music, but she has now received papers from the Appointments officer informing her that she must either seek a teaching post for next September or 'go into industry'. She has been told that she should have applied for the extra year's reservation before. She is now making an application for a place at the Academy. Asks Milne whether she has done everything possible to secure her reservation, 29 March 1944
/87: from Yvonne Blackall, 15 Church Street, Warwick: She has seen Miss Tay and explained that she has been accepted provisionally by the R[oyal] A[cademy] of M[usic]. She did not know whether she should take the Teachers Course but is going to find out, 2 May 1944
/88: from Constance Braithwaite, Social Study Department, The University, University Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham: Informs Milne that Miss Boddy has been awarded a bursary of £5 for the academic session, 12 March 1939
/89: from L. Jackson, 25 Bristol Road, Edgbaston [Birmingham]: Asks Milne to tell Miss Boddy that she must have her trunk removed and comments 'it was rather unpleasant at the end of the term, as they told the men some story & they were already strained', 10 January 1940
/90: from Agnes M. Boore, 19 St Peter Street, Tiverton, Devon: Asks whether she should apply for the post of Assistant Lecturer in French. Gives details of her work experience, 2 July 1933
/91: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Agnes M. Boore: She is away from Bimringham and has just received her letter. She does not think she should apply for the post as she thinks Professor Ritchie 'would like to find a man as some of the work is in the Commerce Department', but that if she want 'to take a sporting chance' then should can apply. Suggests that it might be better for her to continue the Senior School work she is already doing, 11 July 1933
/92: from Charles Grant Robertson, Vice-Chancellor, University of Birmingham: Suggests that Milne consult the Registrar about Miss Both. He will want Milne's advice about how to proceed, 3 June 1935
/93: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Vice-Chancellor [Charles Grant Robertson]: She has asked about an application to the Midland Loan Fund for Miss Booth. The Loan Fund Committee does not meet until the first week in July so they will not know until then what the best plan is for her in view of her examination results, 4 June 1935
/94: from Joan Booth, 15 Fitz Roy Avenue, Harborne, Birmingham: Refers to their previous discussions about her unexpected financial difficulties at home. Informs her that she now has a good chance of getting a £20 grant from the Girls' Realm, London, possibly for two years. If the University could help her with the rest of the money for this year, her family will probably be in a better position to enable her to complete her course, 1 July 1935
/95: from D. J. Cameron, The Registrar, The University, Edgbaston, Birmingham: Informs Milne that Joan Booth passed her exams in Chemistry and Physics but failed German. She should do well in Chemistry and so the financial support she has been given would seem to be justified. Her results in Physics wre not as soon, and the Faculty has not allowed her to continue with the subject, so she will have to find another subsidiary. As she has already passed Biology she can do either Botany or Zoology, 17 July 1935
/96: copy of letter from Milne's secretary to D. J. Cameron, The Registrar, The University, Edgbaston [Birmingham]: Miss Milne is currently on holiday, but will be glad to have record of Joan Booth's work, 31 July 1935
/97: copy of letter from M. E. Leon, Arden, Stoughton Road, Leicester, to Miss France [The Midland Bureau for Educated Women, Employment Department]: If Miss Bradley takes her Honours degree and applies for one year postgraduate courses, she will get a government grant when she has the Diploma, and also the Board of Education recognition as Elementary and Secondary teacher. She should get a good post, as she has her Library experience, as well as good conversational German acquired abroad. It is possible that the College Library will be able to employ her while she is studying. If more opinions of her ability are required, Dr Spiero, Collegiate School, Leicester, taught her German, 9 June 1938
/98: from Mabel France, The Midland Bureau for Educated Women, Employment Department: She has written to Dr Leon about Brenda Bradley and encloses a copy of her reply (see UB/STW/1/1/97). Asks whether Milne has anything to add to the letter. 11 June 1938
/99: from W. G. Stone, Education Officer, Education Committee for the County Borough of Brighton, 54 Old Steine, Brighton: Asks Milne for a report on Josephine Bradley for the academic year 1946-1947, 19 May 1947
/100: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to W. G. Stone, Education Officer, 54 Old Steine, Brighton: Gives a brief report on Josephine Bradley, 23 May 1947
/101: from Blanche Brew, Head Mistress, The High School for Girls, Stroud, Gloucestershire: Asks Milne for guidance about pupils who are thinking of a university course. She mentions Amy Payne who is currently at Birmingham, and another pupil who might go to Birmingham, neither of whom, she thinks, should take an honours degree to then train as teachers. She thinks they would be better advised to take a pass degree in their best subjects and to train for Junior School work during their training year. She thinks there is always demand for teachers with a variety of subjects and such training in secondary schools. Asks Milne whether there is demand for these qualifications, and whether it would be wise to advise certain pupils to take it, 7 October 1936
/102: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Blanche Brew, The High School for Girls, Stroud: She thinks that the 'new Pass Degree', wiht a wide range of choice in it, and three years' post-intermediate work, will be a good choice for 'average students'. Previously, students qualified with a good pass degree and [teacher] training have had some initial difficulty in finding secondary posts in 'good schools' but in each case, when appointments have been made, the Headmistresses have not regretted it. [Teacher] training at Birmingham is general, but 'bias can always be given to the particular equipment in teaching for which a student's personality and her own choice seem best fitted', 9 October 1936
/103: from L. P. Brew, King Edward's Grammar School for Girls, Rose Hill Road, Handsworth, Birmingham, at the Secondary School, Worcester: Asks Milne whether she can recommend any student who might be able to teach Science on a temporary basis, 27 May 1940
/104: from Edward C. Cole, Secretary, The John Sumner Trust: Informs Milne that the Chairman is happy to send £10 for Marjorie Briars, 3 July 1931. A handwritten address in Prefailles, France, is attached for Marjorie Briars
/105: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Marjorie Briars: Explains that she has had a visit from Mrs Humphries, Marjorie Briars' guardian, about financial support during her time in France and, together with Miss France from the Employment Bureau [Midland Bureau for Educated Women] has obtained a gift of £10 from the Sumner Trust which she can use as pocket money during her time as au pair for the Audra family. Asks her to send a letter of thanks to the Sumner Trust, and to Miss France. Asks Marjorie to send her best wishes to Monsieur Audra, as she was once his student, 4 July 1931
/106: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Mrs Humphries: She is sorry she did not see her when she called at the University, but Miss Hammond has told her about her worries about Marjorie Briars. Informs her about the grant from the Sumner Trust, to be sent in instalments by Miss France [Midland Bureau for Educated Women]. Wishes her better health after her forthcoming hospital stay, 4 July 1931
/107: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to [Edward C. Cole, Sumner Trust]: Asks him to thank Mr Sumner for the grant to Marjorie Briars. Assures him that she and her foster parents are 'most deserving and worthy people, and will deeply appreciate the kindness which has been shown to them'. Miss France will send a receipt for the cheque, and will administer the money, 4 July 1931
/108: from L. Humphries, 12 Daniels Road, Bordesley Green, Birmingham: Thanks Milne for the help she has given, by granting £10 to Marjorie to help her while she is abroad. It is a relief to her in the 'very trying time' she is facing. Thanks her for her thoughtfulness about her health, undated [July 1931]
/109: from Marjorie A. Briars, chez Mme Audra, Prefailles, Loire, France: Thanks Milne for her letters and kindness. She has written to Mr Sumner and is about to write to Miss France. Monsieur Audra has not yet arrived at Prefailles. He has just passed his thesis at the Sorbonne, and it has been received with "mention tres honorable". She and Madame Audra have celebrated his success in "Vieux Moncontour" on Saturday evening, 7 July 1931
/110: from Education Secretary, Cambridgeshire Education Committee, Shire Hall, Cambridge: The Committee have received an application from Dulcibel Broderick for the post of School Welfare Officer, which will include the work of school attendance enquiries. Gives further details about the role, and asks Milne to provide a reference, 5 March 1941
/111: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Education Secretary, Cambridgeshire Education Committee, Shire Hall, Cambridge: Sends a recommendation for Dulcibel Broderick who has recently being doing temporary work looking after women evacuated from London, 7 March 1941
/112: from H. C. Bowen, 26 Beauchamp Avenue, Leamington Spa to Miss Macfarlane, The University, Birmingham: Asks whether it might be possible for a grant to be made towards the expenses of his daughter, Anne, for the Geography Department Excursion to Buxton in March, who has no financial assistance like a grant or scholarship
/113: copy of reply to H. C. Bowen, unsigned: The University has not general provision of grants to students towards the expenses of field expeditions. Asks his daughter to make an appointment, as it is sometimes possible to obtain assistance in particular cases, 21 February 1947
/114: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to The Secretary, The Foyle Trust, Boxfoldia Ltd, Birmingham: Discusses the case of Myrtle Irene Brown, a first year student in the School of Music who is experiencing serious financial difficulty. Explains that her father, a railway fitter at Lincoln, died during the last Easter vacation, and her mother is not able to contribute anything towards her training or to support her during the vacation. She is intending to be a teacher, and holds a Board of Education grant. She also has help from the Lincoln Education Committee, but will need £50 a year, for the next two years, to enable her to quality. Hopes that the University will be able to find half of this yearly sum, but asks whether the Trust might consider an application for the rest, 15 June 1944
/115: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to the Vice-Chancellor [Raymond Priestley]: Discusses the case of Myrtle Irene Brown and asks whether the University would be able to provide half the sum of £50 per year for two years. Informs him that she has written to the Foyle Trust for help, and she is sure Professor Hely Hutchinson [Professor of Music] would support the application for assistance, 15 June 1944
/116: handwritten notes indicating sums of money received by Myrtle Brown
/117: from N. Bunce, Clerk to the Trust, Charles Henry Foyle Trust, Dale Road, Bournbrook, Birmingham: Asks for a full report on the work and capabilities of Myrtle Irene Brown. The next meeting of the Higher Education Grants Sub-Committee is being held on 29 June, and if her application is received in time her case can be discussed then, 15 June 1944
/118: from Victor Hely Hutchinson, Professor of Music, The Barber Institute of Fine Arts (Department of Music), The University, Birmingham: Myrtle Brown has completed her first year's work for the B.Mus degree. Gives his opinion of her work and character, and strongly supports the idea of her being given financial assistance so that she can complete her course, 19 June 1944
/119: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Secretary, The Foyle Trust: Encloses application form and letter of recommendation from Professor Hely Hutchinson (see UB/STW/1/1/118). Thinks Myrtle Brown will be able to attend for an interview on 29 June, but is it unlikely that her mother, who is in Lincoln, will be able to attend. Gives Myrtle Brown's lodgings address, 21 June 1944
/120: from N. Bunce. Clerk to the Trust, Charles Henry Foyle Trust, Dale Road, Bournbrook, Birmingham to Myrtle Brown, c/o Misss Bratt, 24 Noel Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham: Confirms that the Trust will make a grant of £25 for the coming year, to be paid in instalments, 30 June 1944
/121: from N. Bunce. Clerk to the Trust, Charles Henry Foyle Trust, Dale Road, Bournbrook, Birmingham to Jane Johnston Milne: A grant of £25 has been made to Myrtle Brown for the first year and her case will be reviewed at the end of the year. If her work is satisfactory, it is likely that the grant will be renewed, 30 June 1944
/122: copy of letter from Milne's secretary to Miss N. Bunce, Charles Henry Foyle Trust, Dale Road, Bournbrook, Birmingham: Acknowledges her letter in Miss Milne's absence. She will be pleased to know the Trustees have bene able to make a grant to Myrtle Brown, 4 July 1944
/123-/124: handwritten notes in pencil on Myrtle Brown's financial position
/125: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Vice-Chancellor [Raymond Priestley]: She has heard that the Foyle Trust has made a grant of £25 to Myrtle Brown, to be renewed next year if her progress is satisfactory. Asks Priestley whether he can mow make a similar grant from his 'poor students fund', 30 August 1944
/126: from Frances Braid, 47 Hagley Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham to Miss Macfarlane: She has arranged with Dr Teall to have Esme Joyce Brooks (Education II), re-Xrayed, 21 January 1947. A note in pencil has been added to the bottom of the letter giving the X ray results
/127: from M. Hammond, The Education Department (Women's Division), The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham: She has received a letter from Mrs Wilson, student Wendy Brown, to inform her of her marriage and 'the fact that she is going to have a child'. She does not want to upset her so she has written a personal note to wish her well 'in the ordeal'. She will have to report her withdrawal from her course and the reason for it to the Board of Education. She thinks the 'incident' should be reported to the Vice-Chancellor. A typed copy of Milne's reply is on the reverse, stating that she will mention the facts to the Vice-Chancellor but thinks that 'in the circumstances...the less said the better', 22-23 April 1940
/128: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Vice-Chancellor [Raymond Priestley]: Mentions a previous conversation with him about a student, Wendy Brown, 'who had married and failed to notify the University authorities and the Education Department'. Informs him that she will now ask postponement of her final examination for one year, 23 April 1940
/129: from M. Hammond, The Education Department (Women's Division), The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham: Agrees that they should tell the Vice-Chancellor about Wendy Brown's case, 23 April 1940
/130: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Miss Brew [possibly L. P. Brew, King Edward's Grammar School for Girls, Rose Hill Road, Handsworth, Birmingham]: Gives details about Wendy Brown, a former pupil who is now in her third year in the School of English, but has married 'a young man in the Municipal Bank' without her parents knowledge. Milne has just found out about this since she will not be able to take her final examinations as she is pregnant. She is applying to the Faculty of Arts for postponement of her final examinations for a year, and will return as a private student in October to complete her degree. Her new husband is now with the Forces as a private, and she will only have a small allowance for herself and the child. Comments on the difficult financial situation of her parents, and wonders whether her former school might have a benevolent fund or whether she might know of alternative sources of funding, 1 May 1940
/131: copy of letter from Secretary of unidentified organisation to Mrs Brown [mother of Wendy Brown]: The Loan Training Fund Committee have discussed Wendy Brown's case and are prepared to give a grant of £15 and a further £5 loan. It is possible that more money might be available. The Committee want to make it clear that she should take some responsibilty for the loan. Miss Milne knows about the Committee's decision and will be calling to see Wendy Brown to discuss the matter, 14 June 1940
/132: from Wendy Wilson [nee Brown], 6 Vicarage Road, Kings Heath, Birmingham: Gives news of the birth of her daughter, and her illness and treatment at the Children's Hospital. They are calling the baby Diana Jane, and hopes that Milne might be able to come to see her when she is out of hospital, 18 August 1940
/133: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to The Principal, Cambridge Training College: Asks advice on behalf of a graduate [Molly Bullock] who has ben teaching in a private school and is now thinking of taking a training course. Gives career details of the graduate who took a 'good pass degree' in 1926 with French and English as final subjects, 4 December 1935
/134: from H. Dent, Cambridge Training College for Women, Cambridge: Suggests tha there is little chance of the graduate Milne asked about obtaining a post in a secondary school with a pass degree, but a training course might help, 6 December [1935]
/135: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to H. Dent, Cambridge Training College for Women, Cambridge: Agrees that the success or failure of a candidate depends on personality. Asks whether she would be prepared to see the graduate, to help her make a decision, 10 December 1936
/136: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Molly Bullock: Suggests that she contact Miss Dent to ask for an interview while she is in London. Advises her to consult the Secretary of the 'Joint Agency' about the chance of better teaching posts if she took a training course, 10 December 1935
/137: from Molly Bullock, Hiatt College, Wellington [Shropshire]: She has written to Miss Dent and agrees that she will also call at the 'Joint Agency' when she is in London, undated [December 1935]
/138: from Molly Bullock, Hiatt College, Wellington [Shropshire]: Informs Milne that Miss Dent advised her to try to do French Honours in one year at Kings College, London. Encloses letters from Miss Brittain about internal and external degrees and asks for Milne's advice, 31 January 1936
/139: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Molly Bullock: Explains that special permission is always needed to allow a student who holds an initial degree from one university to take a degree at another and that London University will not grant that permission. Suggests that she might instead take an M.A degree at Birmingham and that she could speak to Professor Ritchie about it. The alternative would be to spend a year in France which would give her a 'certificate' but the chances of finding a post as au pair in a French university town are small, especially in Paris, 6 February 1936
/140: from Molly Bullock, Hiatt College, Wellington [Shropshire]: She is still unsure what she should do and asks whether she can see Milne at Edmund Street when she is in Birmingham, 16 February 1936
/141: from Molly Bullock, Hiatt College, Wellington, Shropshire: She has given Milne's name as a reference and has written to the Birmingham Education Office to see if she could get a job near home. Her parents have had periods of illness and 'old age & air raids haven't done them much good''. Her father is now suffering from seizures and her mother is alone in the house with no help, so she would like to live at home. Gives details about her family's difficult financial situation and mentions her work at the school which involves housework, 'canteening' and Red Cross work. Asks about her friend Helen Poole, 5 February 1942
/142: from R. H. Jacobs, Harrogate College, Swinton, Masham, Ripon, Yorkshire: M. Bullock has applied for a position as Senior French Mistress and asks about her 'ability and personality'. Gives details of the post and the French staff in the department, 14 April 1942
/143: from Molly Bullock, 74 Shirley Road, Acocks Green [Birmingham]: Her father has died recently. Her brother has been given a month's leave from the army and he is trying to resolve the family's business matters. Part of the letter is missing but Bullock goes on to mention that she has been offered a teaching post, 16 May 1942
/144: from Sister Winifred, St Mary's Convent, Mount Battenhall, Worcester: Gives news about the health of Sister Alban. They had hoped that the population of Worcester would go down but it is 'more crowded than ever & we have over 300 pupils'. The Reverend Mother is grateful to Milne and other academic staff at Birmingham who had 'made the arrangements' and would be happy to welcome them to St Marys, 7 October 1944
/145: copy of letter from Secretary to Senior Woman Tutor to A. D. Munrow, Director of Physical Education: Miss Lysbeth Adcock has seen Dr Braid but has been advised that she can take physical training, 15 October 1943
/146: from M. D. Slater, 47 Weoley Hill, Selly Oak, Birmingham: Gives medical opinion that Miss Bulloughs is suffering from 'nervous debility' and is unfit to take her examination, 29 May 1933
/147: from Nestor Bunditt, 47 Wellington Street, Luton, [Bedfordshire]: After her meeting with the Director of Education it seems unlikely that the scholarship from Bedford will be available and she will be unable to consider going to France to study for a thesis. Her family's financial position is not good, and she is going to write to the school at Ecouen to withdraw. She has written to Miss Freeman to ask whether she could take the job. She is considering studying for an M.A in England. She might come to Birmingham for a few days to stay with Miss Freeman and to meet Professor Ritchie. Asks Milne's opinion on this and whether she might be able to talk to her in Birmingham. She does not think a Diploma course would be right for her and she is not sure about studying for an M.A, 26 August 1932
/148: from Nestor Bunditt, 47 Wellington Street, Luton, [Bedfordshire]: She has heard from Professor Ritchie who advises her not to do a thesis. Since she joined the Oxford Group Movement she has been living on a basis of seeking to follow God's plan. She thinks she should get a job as a companion or domestic help, and will not now come to Birmingham to discuss her career with Milne, 4 September 1932
/149: from Gladys A. Burlton, Women Staff Administrator, British Broadcasting Corporation, Broadcasting House, London: Asks Milne to recommend women graduates for executive posts and gives details of required skills and experience, 7 October 1941
/150: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Gladys Burlton: Suggests Marjorie Eady, an Honours graduate who has studied in Paris and is a trained secretary who has worked in the liaison department of the Censorship [Ministry of Information] since the start of the war, 17 October 1941
/151: from M. J. Baker, Secretary to Women's Establishment Officer, British Broadcasting Corporation, Broadcasting House, London: They are writing to Marjorie Eady for further information in connection with the post, 21 October 1941
/152: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Gladys Burlton, Women Staff Administrator, British Broadcasting Corporation: Recommends Brenda Tripp, Assistant Secretary to the Institute of Petroleum at the University, for a higher post, and Beate Ruhm von Oppen, Art Librarian at the Barber Institute as a linguist, 31 October 1941
/153: from D. Tomlinson, Women's Recruitment Officer, British Broadcasting Corporation, Broadcasting House, London: They have written to Brenda Tripp asking her to call, and have placed Beate Ruhm von Oppen's details on file, 20 November 1941
/154: from Sister Winifred, St Mary's Convent, Worcester: Rev. Mother is pleased that 'Sister' has been accepted. Dr Hawgood is deputing the lecturer in Medieval History, G. Templeman, to interview 'Sister', 27 June 1944
/155: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Sofia Bukraba, 52 Horsedeen Lane, Greenfield, Middlesex: It was recommended at the Faculty meeting that she should take studies appropriate for completion of a B.A degree. Gives further details of subjects to be studied and suggests alternative lodgings in Edgbaston, 11 October 1945
NotesOld Reference: UC3/vi/7
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