Record

LevelFile
Finding Number (Click this to view full catalogue structure)UB/STW/1/5
TitleCorrespondence of Senior Tutor to Women Students N-R
Extent1 file
Date1932-1949
Description/1: from H. M. Cashmore, City Librarian, Birmingham Public Libraries, Reference Library, Birmingham to R. E. Priestley, Vice Chancellor: Reoprts that a book issued to Miss R. Naish is now missing and she has been asked to pay the value of the book but has not replied to his letter. Asks Priestley to take action, 13 June 1940
/2: from Raymond Priestley to Jane Johnston Milne: Asks Milne to deal with the matter relating to the missing book borrowed by Miss R. Naish, 14 June 1940
/3: from Mere St Philippe, The Convent, Harborne Hall: The community is sorry that Miss Nash has done badly in the examinations despite working hard and 'doing her best'. Mentions that she was elected Representative Student by the others and they have been pleased with her and found her loyal and dependable. If she wants to stay at University, 'even as a two year student' [on the teacher training course] they hope she will be allowed to to do, 28 June, undated
/4: from Marguerite Norman, The Croft, Brayton, Nr Selby, Yorkshire: Miss Burnick, a former Birmingham student who is now an English mistress, has advised her to write to Milne for advice in applying to Birmingham and seeking a scholarship. Gives details about her current education and asks about studying Honours English or Grouped Honours. Mentions that Miss Burnick has suggested that she apply for a place in the Education Department as it is not certain she will be able to get a scholarship, 3 January 1937
/5: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to M. Norman, The Croft, Brayton: Gives advice about applying to the Education Department and provides more information about Honours Degrees, 9 February 1937
/6: from Margaret Norton, 163 Malvern Road, St John's, Worcester: She has been to see Dr Braid who has examined her and advised her not to start a course of study, especially not in medicine. She has advised a year's rest with perhaps some months abroad before beginning medical training. Thanks Milne for her advice, 5 October [1932]
/7: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne, Senior Woman Tutor, The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham to The Chief Constable [Birmingham]: Asks for assistance in the case of Hildegard Nothmann, 'a student of German nationality' who has been a student at Birmingham since October 1939 and who is expecting to be called before the Aliens' Tribunal. She is living at 51 Beaufort Road but has been offered a place at University House. She cannot change her address until she has attended the Tribunal, 20 October 1939
/8: from J. Baguley, Superintendent for Chief Constable, Chief Constable's Office (Criminal Investigation Department), Newton Street, Birmingham: Informs Milne that there is no objection to Hildegard Nothmann changing her address as long as she goes to the Alien Registration Office, Newton Stree, to notify them of the change. Her case is expected to come before the Tribunal towards the end of the week, but she can change her address before that, 22 October 1939
/9: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to The Chief Constable [Birmingham]: confirms that Hildegard Nothmann is a registered student at the University of Birmingham. She is satisfied that she wants to study and 'of her loyalty to this country', 26 October 1939
/10: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to unidentified recipient: Certifies that Hildegarde Nothmann is an undergraduate student at Birmingham, admitted for the degree of BA with honours in grouped subjects (English, German, History) and is an excellent student doing good work. Hopes that her case will be considered when applying for entrance to an American University, 14 December 1939. The reverse has been used to copy another letter from Milne, to The Warden, International House, Berkeley, California, which gives a testimonial for Hildegarde Nothmann who is applying for admission to the house, 23 April 1940
/11: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to The Chief Constable, City Police, Birmingham: Supports the application of Hildegarde Nothmann to have permission to use a bicycle. She is living at University House and is unable to pay the tram fare, 8 October 1940
/12: copy of letter on behalf of Jane Johnston Milne to J. Baguley, Superintendent for Chief Constable: She will inform Hildegard Nothmann that she can change her address to University House without waiting for the tribunal's decision, as long as she calls at the Alien Registration Office to notify the change, 23 October 1939
/13: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne, Senior Woman Tutor, The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham to The Secretary, International Student Service, Barnett House, Beaumont Street, Oxford: Asks for help from the International Student Service for Hildegarde Nothmann who is an undergraduate student at Birmingham and unlikely to be able to follow her plan to go to Berkeley University, California, before the end of the war. Explains that she came to Britain on a domestic permit, privately and through no refugee society, in 1938, and began an honours degree in 1939. Her parents were prevented from leaving Holland, where they were waiting for a visa for America, by the German invasion. Hildegard Nothmann now has a visa for America but cannot travel. She has few financial resources but would like to finish her degree. She can support herself by domestic work during university vacations, 14 May 1941
/14: from Iris M. Harris, Relief Secretary, International Student Service Co-Operating Committee for England & Wales Relief Department, Barnett House, Beaumont Street, Oxford: Encloses a questionnaire for Hildegarde Nothmann to complete and asks for a curriculum vitae and academic certificates and reports. Asks whether she has a free place at Birmingham and whether she can retain it if the International Student Service can arrange for her maintenance, 19 May 1941
/15: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne [to Iris M. Harris, Relief Secretary, International Student Service]: Gives testimonial for Hildegarde Nothmann, May 1941
/16: from Hildegarde Nothmann, 11 South Hill Park Gardens, London: Thanks Milne for letting her know that the British Council cannot make her a grant. She has been waiting for a final answer from the International Student Service and has now heard that they are going to help her and will grant her the membership fee, examination fee, and a guinea a week to cover her maintenance at University House. They have also made an application to the British Federation of University Women on her behalf. Her relatives have also sent her some money which will provide 'pocket money', 19 September 1941
/17: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Iris Harris, International Student Service Relief Department, Barnett House, Beaumont Street, Oxford: Asks whether Hildegarde Nothmann will be able to obtain financial assistance [actually from the British Federation of University Women] and when the committee might be able to reach a decision, 17 November 1941
/18: from Erna Hollitischer, British Federation of University Women, Ltd, Emergency Sub-Committee for Refugees, wartime address 16 King Street, Reading, Berkshire: She was upset to find out that Hildegarde Nothmann had not received their grant. Gives details of the amount agreed by the committee, and mentions that she sent a cheque to Iris Harris. Mentions that the International Federation of University Women has promised a grant to another student, Theresa Lazar, but have not been able to find out from the International Student Service what their share of her fees was. Also mentions Miss Bauer, and Miss Maria Kramer, students at Birmingham who have been helped by the organisation, 20 November 1941
/19: from E. M. Higgins, Assistant Secretary, Relief Department, International Student Service, Barnett House, Beaumont Street, Oxford: Milne's letter has been forwarded to Iris Harris in London. Apologises for the delay in communicating the organisation's decision to Hildegarde Nothmann, 20 November 1941
/20: from Iris M. Harris, Relief Secretary, International Student Service Co-Operating Committee for England & Wales Relief Department, Barnett House, Beaumont Street, Oxford: She is writing to Hildegarde Nothmann with a cheque, and payments will continue every four weeks until she finishes her course in the summer, 25 November 1941
/21: from Iris M. Harris, Relief Secretary, International Student Service Co-Operating Committee for England & Wales Relief Department, Barnett House, Beaumont Street, Oxford: She will bring Milne's letter recommending Hildegarde Nothmann as an applicant for financial assistance, to the selection committee when it meets to consider grants for the next academic session, 29 April 1942
/22: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Chairman of the Refugee Committee, British Federation of University Women, Birmingham: Asks for financial assistance for Hildegarde Nothmann and gives details of her current studies at Birmingham and the financial assistance she has received from the International Student Service. Mentions that she is hoping to travel to the United States of America to study, where she had been promised at place at Berkeley University, California, that her father is a 'German judge how at the Hague, where he was waiting for his visa to the United States when Holland was over-run'. She has some relatives in the United States but they are not able to help her. 'She has been most courageous and determined to keep going during these difficult times, taking domestic posts during vacations to help with expenses during the term', 29 April 1942
/23: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Dr E. Hollitscher, British Federation of University Women, 16 King Street, Reading, Berkshire: Gives details of the grants Hildegarde Nothmann receives from the International Student Service which includes funds form the Council for Refugees in Birmingham. Realises that the British Federation of University Women might not be able to offer more help, but states that any additional funding would be appreciated, 30 June 1942
/24: from Erna Hollitscher, British Federation of University Women, Ltd, Emergency Sub-Committee for Refugees, wartime address 16 King Street, Reading, Berkshire: Explains what the organisation has decided about the grant for Hildegarde Nothmann and confirms that they will consider her application for a grant for the coming year, 27 May 1942
/25: from Iris M. Harris, Secretary, Advisory & Relief Department, International Student Service Co-Operating Committee for England & Wales Relief Department, Barnett House, Beaumont Street, Oxford: Asks about further arrangements for financial assistance for Hildegarde Nothmann in her last year of study and whether there is any possibility of her receiving financial assistance from organisations in Birmingham. Mentions that Maria Kramer's application came too late to be considered by the Selection Committee but she has written to the British Council to see whether they might reconsider their decision and would be able to give her a grant, 22 June 1942
/26: from Hildegarde Nothmann, University House [Birmingham]: she has had a letter from Irene Friedlander, Secretary of the Birmingham Council for Refugees, and that they and the International Student Service will share the expense of her educational fees. The Council is going to claim for her maintenance under the Government Grant Scheme, 27 June 1942
/27: from Leyton Richards, Warden, Woodbrooke, Selly Oak, Birmingham: He has received Milne's cheque for £5 which will be put towards the maintenance of Hildegard Nothmann next term. They are pleased to have Hildegard with them for another term, 9 December 1942
/28: from Leyton Richards, Warden, Woodbrooke, Selly Oak, Birmingham: Discusses the cheque received from Birmingham Council for Refugees on behalf of Hildegarde Nothmann. Asks whether Milne can send another cheque, 21 January 1943
/29: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Leyton Richards, Warden, Woodbrooke, Selly Oak, Birmingham: Encloses a further cheque for £5 towards Hildegarde Nothmann's fees, 4 February 1943
/30: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Vice-Chancellor [Raymond Priestley]: Gives details about Hildegard Nothmann, and her need for a small amount of financial help. Mentions that she is currently in the Education Department preparing for the University Diploma in Teaching. 'She has had a great struggle with her finances all along. She is well worth helping over the last lap and I am sure she will make good', 11 February 1943
/31: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Miss Sheldon, Benenden School, Newquay: Gives a testimonial for Hildegarde Nothmann, who has applied for a post at the school, 18 May 1943
/32: from Hildegard Nothmann, Chinthurst School, Tadworth, Surrey: Asks Milne whether she can send a covering letter commenting on her academic work to go with her application for naturalisation. She would like to be naturalised as it would make it easier for her to find a post in a state school, and a British passport will enable her to travel more freely, 17 May 1946
/33: from P[hilip] Sargant Florence, Faculty of Commerce and Social Science, The University, Edgbaston, Birmingham: Asks for Milne's views about Rosemary Oliver who is taking a BA in French and has applied for a Social Study diploma. Mentions that the department has to limit the number of applicants and give priority to 'ex-service girls', 22 May 1946
/34: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Professor Sargent Florence: Gives her opinion of Rosemary Oliver and mentions that she is the daughter of a Methodist minister in West Bromwich and wants to have a career in social work and has relevant experience, 24 May 1946
/35: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to the Graham Street Trust: Supports Rosemary Oliver's appliation for financial assistance and gives a character recommendation, 25 September 1946
/36: from A. P. Braddock, Head of the Men's Division, Education Department, The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham: Dr Clayton thinks that 'O'Neil' must delay his journey to France. Mentions possible financial difficulties and the use of the Students Fund, 17 March 1939
/37: handwritten copy of testimonials for Beate Ruhm von Oppen written by A. M. D. Hughes and J. S. Stephens, University of Birmingham staff, undated
/38: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Secretary, Joint Matriculation Board, Manchester: Writes in support of Hedwig Ostberg, a 'young alien who has had to overcome great difficulties in her studies of English Literature' and wishes to read for a Degree in Arts. Asks for consideration in recognising her certificate as Matriculation, undated [October 1940]
/39: from W. F. S. Holmes, Assistant Secretary, Joint Matriculation Board, 315 Oxford Road, Manchester: Asks Milne to inform him how long Hedwig Ostberg has bene in England, and to let him have any other information about her preparation for the examination, 12 October 1940
/40: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to 'W. F. S. Holmes, Assistant Secretary, Joint Matriculation Board]: Gives details about Hedwig Ostberg who came to England in May 1939 and has been studying at King's High School for Girls, Warwick. Gives the address of her Jewish school in Berlin and her academic studies there, 16 October 1940
/41: from W. F. S. Holmes, Assistant Secretary, Joint Matriculation Board, 315 Oxford Road, Manchester: Informs Milne that the case of Hedwig Ostberg will have to be considered by the Board. He will let her have the decision after the Board meeting in November, 31 October 1940
/42: from Eleanor Doorly, Head Mistress, The King's High School for Girls, Warwick: Confirms that Renate [Hedwig] Ostberg was a pupil at the school from May 1939 to July 1940. Gives a testimonial for her, 5 June 1941
/43: from Agnes B. Read, Tutor, The Institute of Hospital Almoners, Tavistock House (North), Tavistock Square [London]: Thanks Milne for her helpful letter about Sheila Paine who has been interviewed and accepted for a post as hospital almoner, 5 May 1944
/44: from Elle L. Ritchie, St George's Court, Bournville, Birmingham: Discuses one of her pupils, Joan Parker who has chosen to study French and is ambitious. Remarks that her subjects are not suitable for elementary school work but she does not think she will get a post in a secondary school. She wants to study for a degree course rather than a two year course. Gives details of her family circumstances including her father's ill health, her hopes to live away from Birmingham, and her previous visits to France, 9 October [1938]
/45: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Miss Ritchie: Thanks her for her letter about Joan Parker's family circumstances. Mentions her choice of French and comments that a post in a secondary school seems remote. Suggests that it might be possible to help her with speech training, 11 October 1938
/46: typed copy of report on personal and family background of Joan Parker, a second year student in the French department whose father has been experiencing episodes of mental ill health, 4 Decvember 1939
/47: from Raymond Priestley, Vice-Chancellor, University of Birmingham: He has spoken to Dr Jordan about Joan Parker and her home circumstances. If it is not possible for her mother to make another application perhaps it might be possible for Janet Carpenter to find her a place at University House, with financial assistance from the 'Poor Students Fund' and other sources, 6 December 1939
/48: memorandum from M. Hammond to Jane Johnston Milne: She has written to Mr Burton [University Seceretary] about Joan Parker's financial situation and has asked for as large a grant as possible which might have to be supplemented by a loan, 16 September 1941
/49: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to M. Hammond: Suggests that it might be possible for Joan Parker to get financial assistance from the Graham Street Trust, and that it would be best to do this through Miss [Mabel] France, 1 October 1941
/50: from Joan Parker, Guild of Undergraduates Union, Edmund Street, Birmingham: Asks whether Milne will provide a reference for her applications for posts in schools, 23 February 1942
/51: from Margaret F. Parr, 6 Stanley Street, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire to Miss Macfarlane: She has written permission from the Education Department to continue the postgraduate year in London. Mr Sparrow forwarded the address of the Institute of Education but she would like to know whether there are any other places where she could study, and whether colleges must be affiliated to London University, 18 August 1949
/52: from Mary J. Carter, Lower House, Sidbury, Bridgnorth, Shropshire: She has a place at Birmingham and asks about living accommodation and a list of books required for the German degree course, 22 August 1949
/53: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Reverend Mother General: Discusses the matter of six months stay in France which would normally be necessary as part of Sister Pauline's training for her degree in French. Explains that Birmingham, in common with most other universities, is deciding to follow normal practice and send all those who wish to go, but because of the war they are asking students to make sure of parental consent before starting to arrange permits. Recommends that Sister Pauline should go because she needs the opportunity to improve her spoken French and to meet the residential qualification of the Board of Education for teachers of French, 26 January 1940
/54: from Evelyn M. Payne, 102 Baldwins Lane, Hall Green, Birmingham: Miss Hammond has suggested that she complete as much of a pass degree as possible and she should take a Primary Teachers Certificate the following year, specialising in senior work, so that it would be possible to return to the University [after the war] to complete her pass degree in English and two other one year courses. Asks Milne for suggestions for French reading, 2 July 1943
/55: from Doris Peacock, 76 Hutton Avenue, West Hartlepool: Asks for advice. She has been offered a temporary post at George Dixon Boys School and needs to write to the Board of Education to confirm that she is withdrawing from the Education Department for the coming year. Comments on Professor Ritchie's speech at the University of Birmingham Degree Day and on her crowded train journey. Mentions recent air raids and her work on the allotment, 12 July 1942
/56: from Doris Peacock, 76 Hutton Avenue, West Hartlepool: Thanks Milne for her help in composing a letter to the Board of Education. She has also written to Miss Hammond, and summarises her reply. Discusses arrangements for the start of her post at George Dixon Boys School and mentions that she has written to Mr Brooks of the [University] Appointments Board who has advised her to inform the Ministry of Labour that she will be taking up a teaching post and will not be taking the course for the Teachers Diploma. Asks whether she should write to the Registrar and ask for her scholarship to be postponed, 16 August 1942
/57: from Doris Peacock, 76 Hutton Avenue, West Hartlepool: She has received a letter from the Board of Education and asks for Milne's advice. She is worried they will prevent the Birmingham Education Authority from employing her and will make her pay back the money she has received. Miss Hammond has already given her opinion, 21 August 1942
/58: draft letter in pencil written by Jane Johnston Milne to the Board of Education about Doris Peacock's decision to take a teaching post, 16 August 1942
/59: draft letter in pencil written by Jane Johnston Milne to the Board of Education about Doris Peacock's decision to take a teaching post, 25 August 1942
/60: from Doris Peacock, 76 Hutton Avenue, West Hartlepool: Thansk Milne for her help. She is going to Birmingham the following day before she starts her job and gives her address there. Gives news of her brother's success in his School Certificate, 3 September 1942
/61: from E. G. Parker, Board of Education, Branksome Dene Hotel, Bournemouth to Miss D. M. Peacock, 76 Hutton Avenue, West Hartlepool: The Board's view is that she should return to the Training Department to take the year of professional training. Asks her to inform the Board whether she returns to training or accepts the teaching post that has been offered to her, 9 September 1942
/62: Comments on the most recent letter from the Board of Education (see UB/STW/1/5/61) and asks for Milne's advice. She has enjoyed her first week of teaching and mentions that Hilda Twiss [another former Birmingham student?] is also there, 12 September 1942
/63: postscript to letter from Doris Peacock which refers to miss Hammon's letter, undated [1942]
/64: from Doris Peacock, 19 Oakwell Avenue, Roundhay, Leeds: Discusses her attempts to go to France and encloses letters she has received in reply to hers to the Ministry of Education and the British Institute. Comments on the devaluation of the franc, the reopening of Cite Universitaire, and the worsening food situation. Asks Milne whether she should write again to the secretary of the British Institute. She would like to leave her job at Roundhay by the end of the summer but will need to let them know by the end of the term. She also needs to obtain a passport, 13 January 1946
/65: from Pauline Phillips (nee Jones), The Manor House, Tamworth: Asks Milne to act as a reference for jobs she is applying for. Hopes she has not suffered any damage in the Birmingham air raids, 19 July 1941
/66: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne's secretary to Pauline Phillips: Informs her that Milne will be pleased to act as a reference, and thanks her for letting her know about her change of name on her marriage, 23 July 1941
/67: copy of letter from George Grant, Registrar to Miss E. B. Perry, 19 Pembroke Croft, Hall Green, Birmingham: He has consulted the Dean of the Faculty of Commerce and he has now agreed to let her repeat the second year course for the degree of B.Com instead of requiring her to withdraw from the University, 8 July 1946
/68: from Elfriede Pichler, Woodbrooke [Birmingham]: She has heard about a chance to get some financial assistance from the Refugee Committee in Birmingham towards maintenance for the following year. They have asked for a testimonial from her tutor and asks Milne whether she can provide this and leave it with Mother Augustine, 15 June 1942
/69: from Elfriede Pichler, Stanbrook Abbey, Callow End, Worcester: She has been waiting for information about going to Oxford or Cambridge and has been trying to get more details from Miss Smith's friend. Miss Lane Poole, who is a moral tutor to students at St Annes. Sets out the possible options they have discussed, 12 July [1943]
/70: from Elfriede Pichler, Stanbrook Abbey, Callow End, Worcester: A friend who knows the Principal of St Hugh's [College, Oxford] has head from Miss Gwyer that it might be possible to be attached to the college without being resident there and to become a member of the university. She has to get in touch with Professor Rudler and asks Milne's advice about how to do this. She has been doing some reading, both spiritual and secular, at the Abbey, and has also been working in the garden and enjoying attending some of the offices to hear the plainchant, 26 July [1943]
/71: from Elfriede Pichler, Stanbrook Abbey, Callow End, Worcester: She has had a letter from the Registrar at Birmingham to say that the Ministry of Labour will not grant her a further year of study and advising her to apply for a teaching job. Asks for Milne's advice, 3 August [1943]
/72: from Elfriede Pichler, Stanbrook Abbey, Callow End, Worcester: She has written to Miss Tay as Milne advised. She has not been able to find any French job except somewhere in a remote part of Wales. Professor Ritchie thinks she should apply for a teaching job near Birmingham and study for the BA as a part time student. Thanks Milne for enquiring about financial assistance. The landgirl at the Abbey has left and so she has been doing this work but it will not cover all her expenses, 18 August [1943]
/73: from Elfriede Pichler, Stanbrook Abbey, Callow End, Worcester: She has had an interview with Miss Tay at Edgbaston Appointments Office who is going to apply to the Foreign Office on her behalf and has also suggested applying to the BBC in connection with her knowledge in French and German. Asks about the possibility of studying part time for a BA if she was working at the Foreign Office. Discusses her reading on Catholicism and mentions that she is doing more full time work on the land, including harvesting, 5 September [1943]
/74: from Elfriede Pichler, Stanbrook Abbey, Callow End, Worcester: Violet Warren, a former student, is teaching at a school in Colwall, St Nicholas, and has told her there is a job vacancy there. She has been to see the headmistress to find out details about the post but she does not think she should accept it. She has not heard anything about a possible job at the Foreign Office. Hopes she will be able to discuss her choices with Milne in Birmingham, 28 September [1943]
/75: from Elfriede Pichler, Stanbrook Abbey, Callow End, Worcester: She has been to see Miss Tay at Five Ways but she is away on holiday. Thanks Milne for giving her courage to face the next period of waiting. She hopes she she can at least get a temporary job in Birmingham. Asks whether she needs to do anything about the MA for the university authorities, 6 October 1943
/76: from Mary Pierce, 8 Summerfield Road, Bridlington, E[ast] Yorks[hire]: Thanks Milne for letting her know about the post at Sheffield. She has asked for the application form. She has got an interview for a London school, St Saviours and St Olaves, New Kent Road, 30 April 1939
/77: from Mary Pierce, 8 Summerfield Road, Bridlington, E[ast] Yorks[hire]: She has applied for posts at both Hurlfield Secondary School and the Central Secondary School in Sheffield. Miss Freeman has sent her a log of information. One of the posts is primarily in English and she has no qualifications in that subject. She did not send a testimonial from Bridlington which also counted against her. She was not successful with the London post either. She has asked Miss Main for another testimonial, which she has been given. Encloses a copy for Milne to see, 16 May 1939
/78: handwritten copy of testimonial for Mary Pierce, written by Marjorie Main, Headmistreet, The High School for Girls, Bridlington, 16 May 1939
/79: from M. Hammond, The Education Department (Women's Divison), The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham to Miss Bodkin, Secretary to Miss Milne: She had previously heard that Mary Louise Pierce was thinking of accepting temporary work in a Bank, but would like to go back into teaching. Remarks that she was 'hardly treated in her post in Bridlington'. She is anxious to get a post for Renee Mitchell who, on her recommendation, refused service in a Birmingham Elementary School, and was the best teacher of her year, 17 October 1939
/80: from M. Hammond, The Education Department (Women's Divison), The University, Edmund Street, Birmingham: Miss M. R. Pleming, Honours English, has applied for a year of professional training in the Education Department. asks Milne for her opinion, especially about whether she is more suited for elementary or secondary school training, 19 March 1941
/81: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Miss Hammond: Gives her opinion on the personality and ability of Miss M. R. Pleming, 20 March 1941
/82: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne's secretary to Miss Price: Thanks her for sending details about the au pair post. Suggests Joan Sheppard as a possible candidate and gives details about her family background and personality and character, 23 May 1938
/83: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne's secretary to Miss [Joan] Sheppard: Mentions an au pair post with Madame Thomas. Asks her to delay sending an application until she has heard from Miss Price, 23 May 1938
/84: from Phyllis Price, 103 Dane Road, Stoke, Coventry: Asks whether there are any students suitable for a post as an au pair in France for the summer. She would like Milne to send her details of individual students before they apply so that she can let Madame Thomas know, 18 May 1938
/85: from Phyllis Price, 103 Dane Road, Stoke, Coventry: Asks for a reference for Joan Sheppard which she can send to Madame Thomas, 24 May 1938
/86: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Monsieur de Laigue: Writes on behalf of a Birmingham graduate, Phyllis Reichel, nee Price, who is British born but has married a Czech man and is having difficulty obtaining a visa for France. It is not possible for her to go to the French Office in person as she has a young baby, 1 October 1946
/87: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Raymond Priestley, Vice-Chancellor: Asks for his consideration for financial assistance from the Poor Students' Fund for Constance Pugh who has lost her home, and her widowed mother, a tailor, has lost her business, after their house at Wynn Street, above Bristol Street, was destroyed [in an air raid]. Gives details of her current grants and asks for help with her maintenance until the end of the academic year, 10 December 1940
/88: typed receipt for £5 received from Miss Milne by Constance Pugh, 15 January 1941
/89: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Victor Watson, Director, Egyptian Education Office, 4 Central Buildings, London: Asks for permission for Aziza Radwan, an MSc student, to change her lodging to live with Mrs Collins, 5 Frederick Road, Edgbaston. She is on the list of recommended lodging issued by the University and her house has been inspected, 22 November 1938
/90: from Victor Watson, Egyptian Ministry of Education, Egyptian Education Office, 4 Central Buildings, London: Agrees to Aziza Radwan going to live with Mrs Collins as long as her period of notice is acceptable to Harborne Hall, 23 November 1938
/91: from Ernest W. Burbridge, Meidland Regional Office, The British Council: Explains that the British Council is anxious to bring back British subjects from Thailand and arrangements for the exchange of British and 'Siamese' subjects are being made. Comments on the question of employment for student Suparb Raktprachit and states that the British Council in London is working with the International branch of the Ministry of Labour but it is difficult to find employment of the kind suited to Suparb Raktprachit's abilities, 26 May 1942
/92: copy of letter from George Grant, Registrar, to Miss. E. Reed, 85 Wolverhampton Road, Birmingham: He has consulted the Dean of the Faculty of Commerce and he has agreed to allow her to repeat the second year course for the degree of B.Com instead of being required to withdraw from the University, 8 July 1946
/93: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Dr P. D. Innes, Education Office, Margaret Street, Birmingham: She has received questionnaires on the application of Cynthia Rees and Kathleen Leonard for training in organising under the Birmingham Authority. Gives testimonials for both students, 9 November 1938
/94: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Miss I. N. Steadman, 48 Castlecroft Road, Finchfield, Wolverhampton: She is anxious to help a former student, Suzette Rickman, who took a first class degree in French and then an MA, and has worked at the Compassion Convent Schools at Olton and Acocks Green as French and Latin mistress under the name of Mere St Jean Vianney. She now wishes to leave her convent and to look for a post in a secular school. Asks whether the Board of Education is able to do anything to help her, 18 May 1942
/95: from D. Hodge, Head Mistress, Lichfield, The Friary School, The Friary, Lichfield: She has interviewed S. Rickman as an applicant for her second French post, with Latin and possibly some Junior School Arithmetic. Asks about her capability to take Latin up to Higher School Certificate subsidiary standard for girls who will need it to take an Arts Degree at university, 30 November 1942
/96: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to D. Hodge, The Friary School, Lichfield: Comments on S. Rickman’s abilities and her qualifications and experience in Latin as well as on her personality and character, 1 December 1942
/97: from D. Hodge, Head Mistress, Lichfield, The Friary School, The Friary, Lichfield: Thanks Milne for her advice about Miss Rickman. She has offered her the post and she has accepted it. Hopes she will be happy and thinks it will give her ‘a very good beginning in a public school’, 3 December 1942
/98: from Mary Rigby, Fairhaven, Marsh Lane, Longton, Preston: She is able to repay a portion of the £10 which Milne allowed her to borrow from the University Fund. She would like to be able to repay more, but she is still paying back instalments of her loan from Lancashire County. Gives details about her work teaching French, Physical Training, and Music at Irlam Central School in Manchester. She has now decided to apply for secondary school posts again and had an interview at Darwen Grammar School where she met Kathleen Reed. Hopes that Kathleen has now been able to get a temporary post somewhere else. Informs Milne that she has accepted a war time post at Calday Grange Grammar School in West Kirby. She hopes for a reply from Blackburn High School. Hopes that the university buildings at Edgbaston have escaped damage and ‘that the cultural life of the city is still flourishing as it is in Manchester’, 8 March 1941
/99: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne’s secretary to Mr Norgroves, Accountant’s Office, Edmund Street [Birmingham]: Encloses £1 which Miss Milne has received from Mary Rigby as the first instalment of the loan she is replaying, 11 March 1941
/100: from Muriel Rigden Green, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Edgbaston, Birmingham: She has a job as a house surgeon at the hospital, and she is enjoying the work. She is trying to prepare for her December examination at the same time, 17 October, undated
/101: from Elle L. Ritchie, Head Mistress, George Dixon Grammar School for Girls, City Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham: Asks for advice about three pupils who will be beginning studies at the University in October, Sheila Pain, Brenda Andrews, and Alma Clayton. Gives detailed accounts of their academic studies and career plans. Suggests that Milne will ‘find these girls of mine much more of the calibre of Margaret Wharam and Phyllis Nicklin that any students I have sent you since so I am hoping for great things from them’. Mentions Joan Parker who recently qualified with a French degree, and gives her view that her result reflects on her and on the University, 23 September 1941
/102: from Janet Robbins, 14 Beacon Rise, Sedgley, Nr Dudley: She has written to Staffordshire Education Committee about her grant but has not had a reply. Asks Milne’s advice about what she should do, 6 December 1945
/103: copy of letter from Jane Johnston Milne to Director [Staffordshire Education Committee]: Asks when Janet Robbins should expect to receive the first instalment of her grant. Mentions that she has had to withdraw from the Education Department as she was not permitted by Ministry of Education regulations to hold the Ministry Grant and the county award at the same time, 12 December 1945
/104: copy of UB/STW/1/5/103
/105: from F. A. Hughes, Director of Education, Staffordshire Education Committee: He has arranged to pay the University fees on behalf of Janet Robbins, and two thirds of the maintenance grant to the parent, 17 December 1945
/106: from Janet Robbins, 14 Beacon Rise, Sedgley, Nr Dudley: Thanks Milne for her help. Her father has now received a cheque for £50 from the Staffordshire Education Committee towards her maintenance grant, 20 December 1945
/107: copy of letter from N. Macfarlane to Dean of the Faculty of Arts: Discusses the case of Joan Robbins, a third year student who wishes to study French I and Spanish II in her third year for the ordinary degree of BA instead of Spanish II and III. Comments on her previous education and course choices, 15 December 1945
/108: from F. M. Foster, High School for Girls, Malvern Hall, Solihull, Warwickshire: Asks whether Milne can advise one of her pupils, Jean Robinson, who wants to take a Science degree at the University, 1 June 1942
/109: from Beate Ruhm von Oppen: Gives details about her parents and younger sister, Delia, who have been able to come to England, and expresses her concerns about the family’s efforts to emigrate to America and her worries about being interned, 26 June 1940
NotesOld Reference: UC3/vi/8
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